Thursday, May 19, 2005

Technology? Cute ... but wrong! Adoption is what it's all about

Technology, technology, technology ... everyone is talking about technology but not many are discussing the effects of technology. That's where the power is. It's called innovation and as Michael Schrage stated in his last column for Technology Review, "...innovation isn’t what innovators do; it’s what customers, clients, and people adopt."

Innovation isn’t about crafting brilliant ideas that change minds; it’s about the distribution of usable artifacts that change behavior. Innovators—their optimistic arrogance notwithstanding—don’t change the world; the users of their innovations do. That’s not a subtle distinction.

The Big Lie of the Information Age is that “Nothing is more powerful than an idea whose time has come.” What nonsense. In reality, nothing in this world is more powerful than an innovation that has diffused to the point where it enjoys both global reach and global impact. Ready access to ideas promotes awareness, but ready access to innovation promotes empowerment and opportunity.

The accelerating spread of innovation ultimately amounts to the greatest revolution in choice the world has ever known. The diffusion of innovation is about the diffusion of choice—both good and bad. The more choices you have, the more your values matter.

3 Comments:

Blogger MiddleMan said...

Sure I agree with you.

But with a small change in paradign you can see that "Nothing is more powerful than an idea whose time has come" is a quote that backs your point, right?

You could say that overtime, the quote's time has come, if it wasn't immediately accepted whenever it was coined.

Now, "coined," we could go to blows arguing what that means.

As far as "The accelerating spread of innovation ultimately amounts to the greatest revolution in choice the world has ever known. The diffusion of innovation is about the diffusion of choice—both good and bad. The more choices you have, the more your values matter."

It's been awhile since I studied logic and the English language, but (as I did back then), I'd have to guess that, given more context, perhaps a few more axioms?, you're probably right about that too.

But I doubt that the more flavors Baskin-Robbins added that it mattered to their customers what was and wasn't value based.

Adkins might disagree. :) <-the dreaded smiley face

1:30 PM, January 13, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Value is in the eye of the beholder, subjectively speaking. I agree with your thoughts but look at the latest addition to this blog - there is a maximum value to technology, isn't there?

3:40 PM, January 27, 2005  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

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7:49 AM, November 01, 2006  

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