Tuesday, April 11, 2006

Convergence bought

It's beginning to feel as though actors need advanced degrees in computer technology and economics just to keep up with their industry. Every day, the trades shout front-page news of another media conglomerate or mogul making a million-dollar partnership to develop entertainment for new media, such as the Internet and mobile devices.

Just this year, for example:

  • NBC Universal acquired the female-oriented Web portal iVillage for $600 million
  • Disney unveiled a new Web service called My ABC, which will offer free ad-supported content as well as downloads of "Lost," "Desperate Housewives," and "Grey's Anatomy"
  • Mark Burnett signed to produce an interactive online reality series titled Gold Rush for AOL
  • Ashton Kutcher's Katalyst Films announced it will create at least five comedies for AOL.com and its instant messaging service
  • Steven Spielberg partnered with Yahoo! to develop online programming
And the list goes on. Making a difference? Or making a killing?

2 Comments:

Anonymous Matt O'Neill said...

Seems to me, it doesn't matter whether most actors keep up or not.

They are plying their trade(s), but now have a range of 'new media' channels with which to do so.

Doesn't the 'new media' represent new opportunities to both famous and less well known characters?

As the 'media' seeks to make enhanced profits (or brand new), channels become more niche. New players emerge. Aren't Robert Scoble, Hugh Macleod, (and you of course), actors in a new medium?

More business minded actors may choose to keep up, but others probably don't need to. Their conglomerates will do that for them.

However, one reason for actors needing to keep up is that the new channels demands different skill sets. I.E If they don't know the new game, how can they play it?

M

3:45 PM, April 11, 2006  
Anonymous Matt O'Neill said...

Seems to me, it doesn't matter whether most actors keep up or not.

They are plying their trade(s), but now have a range of 'new media' channels with which to do so.

Doesn't the 'new media' represent new opportunities to both famous and less well known characters?

As the 'media' seeks to make enhanced profits (or brand new), channels become more niche. New players emerge. Aren't Robert Scoble, Hugh Macleod, (and you of course), actors in a new medium?

More business minded actors may choose to keep up, but others probably don't need to. Their conglomerates will do that for them.

However, one reason for actors needing to keep up is that the new channels demands different skill sets. I.E If they don't know the new game, how can they play it?

M

3:45 PM, April 11, 2006  

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