Tuesday, April 04, 2006

$ign of the Times

From Jon Lebkowsky at worldchanging:

Day one of David Isenberg's two-day Freedom to Connect conference in DC has ended, and I don't know that we have a handle on "net neutrality" or the larger issue of how we sustain the freedom and openness that has been so much a part of the Internet's architecture and culture throughout its history. Money changes everything, and the Internet is clearly a platform for profitable innovation.

As FCC Commissioner Michael Copps pointed out in his opening address, we view the Internet as a place of freedom and openness where the possibilities for innovation are endless, with a dumb network and intelligence at the edges. But we're hearing a warning: new broadband "toll bridges" that would give network providers a cut of content providers' profits could restrict this freedom, openness, and innovation.

To ask web sites to pay for the traffic they generate is problematic in two ways: companies for delivery of content. But it's a model that's possible, and one that it's the content that makes the broadband service valuable, and the large service providers would be "double dipping" by charging users for access and web-based service providers like AT&T and Verizon are seriously considering as a way to participate in the success of companies like Google.

7 Comments:

Blogger paulaner01 said...

Let's just hope that we can let the free market take care of this and not Congress. Because if it's freedom, openness, and innovation we want, we're better off leaving it to the consumer and the marketplace than we are to self-serving politicians. If ISPs do anything fishy, they'll lose business. We don't need laws to confirm that.

4:34 AM, April 05, 2006  
Blogger J David Galipeau said...

I agree but the spoilers need a hook - I would assume that 'laws' are the equalizers when it comes to this sort of tampering. But however legitamite it is, intellectual property and media laws or policies handed down from above rarely hold on to the strings too long.

Thank someone that there is always someone that needas a breath of fresh air and will do what it takes to get it ...

9:42 AM, April 05, 2006  
Blogger oldhats said...

I agree wuth Paulaner--consumers are already protected by the market and current FCC regulations...Congressional meddling is not the answer.

12:33 PM, April 05, 2006  
Blogger pkp646 said...

I want to take the time to point out something else: there is no problem. There is no net neutrality violations occuring and it doesn't appear that they will. Why bother trying to fix what isn't broken?

7:53 PM, April 05, 2006  
Blogger pkp646 said...

I want to take the time to point out something else: there is no problem. There is no net neutrality violations occuring and it doesn't appear that they will. Why bother trying to fix what isn't broken?

7:53 PM, April 05, 2006  
Blogger oldhats said...

pkp, You make a valid point. (twice!) The best reason not to legislate is because there is no problem--it's all speculation and conjecture.

1:10 PM, April 06, 2006  
Anonymous Ancient of Days said...

Many years ago, I worked at AT&T Labs. One of the services my team supported for corporate customers was VPN. Isn't that the same sort of thing the telcos are discussing now? "You want better Broadband? We'll give you better Broadband. You'll give us money." Somehow, there are way too many people off chasing windmills and waving "Network Neutrality" as their war banner. They seem to think that someone is going to limit their personal access, when what the telcos want is to be able to work with their customers on the other end of the pipe to develop new things for that personal access to access.

7:43 PM, April 06, 2006  

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